Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) is a research centre of the University of the Arts London dedicated to the exploration of the rich complexities of sound as an artistic practice.

Our main aim is to extend the development of the emerging disciplinary field of sound arts and to encourage the broadening and deepening of the discursive context in which sound arts is practised.

Research Feature: Her Noise: Feminisms and the Sonic

This series of events investigated feminist discourses in sound and music through a programme of talks, performances, discussions and film screening. It also marked the donation of the Her Noise Archive to the University of the Arts London Archives and Special Collections housed at London College of Communication , and was realised as a collaboration between CRiSAP (Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice), Electra and Tate in 2012.
More...

Member Profile: Louise Marshall

Louise Marshall comes to PhD research after a long career as a music and arts critic specialising in contemporary and experimental music and performance. Writing under the name of Louise Gray, she has published extensively in publications that include The Wire, Musicworks, New Internationalist, the Guardian, the Museums Journal and she is a former music correspondent of The Times and the Independent on Sunday. Her book on discourses within world music, The No-Nonsense Guide to World Music, was published in 2009 by New Internationalist. She also contributed a chapter on the use of music in the films of Nina Danino to Visionary Landscapes (Black Dog Publishing, 2004), and a section on Pauline Oliveros to the museum catalogue of the Whitney Biennial 2014.
More...

Blog: James Dooley awarded the LOMA 18 Artist Commission for “Have​ ​you​ ​talked​ ​about​ ​the​ ​weather​ ​today?”

This video and sound installation invites the audience to take a virtual trip on the International Space Station—the ultimate indoors experience—and experience a sonic Baudrillardian simulacrum of ground level weather and atmospheric conditions relative to the ISS’s position above the Earth.
More...