CRiSAP is a research centre of the University of the Arts London dedicated to the exploration of the rich complexities of sound as an artistic practice.

Our main aim is to extend the development of the emerging disciplinary field of sound arts and to encourage the broadening and deepening of the discursive context in which sound arts is practised.

Research Feature: Staging Disorder

Staging Disorder was an exhibition of photography, sound and moving image exploring the contemporary representation of the real in relation to modern conflict at London College of Communication (LCC) in 2014, curated by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann. The photographic works posed questions about the nature of truth as it manifests itself in current photographic practice - while the sound works extended these themes adding a multi-dimensional resonance with sound and moving image installations and written texts.
More...

Member Profile: Tansy Spinks

Tansy Spinks has a PhD from UAL, a BA in Fine Art from Leeds Polytechnic, an MA in Photography from the Royal College of Art and is a Licentiate of the Guildhall School of Music (violin). Her sound performances have taken place in many venues and sites including the V&A, Camden Arts Centre, the Horse Hospital, Beaconsfield, Parasol Unit, Pitzhanger Manor, a seafort off the North Kent coast, Wimbledon Space, Brixton Market, a lift, Chelsea College of Arts, staircases in Edinburgh and Wolverhampton Universities, White Cube, Bermondsey and on top of a windmill. Her practice-based PhD research involving live, site specific, associative sound performance, was based in the department of Creative Research into Sound Art Practice (CRiSAP) at London College of Communication, University of the Arts, London with Angus Carlyle, David Toop and Cathy Lane.
More...

Blog: Writing Into the Maelstrom

Blog post by David Toop, 'Writing Into the Maelstrom': The thought of writing a book on free improvisation had been on my mind for many years. At some point in the late 1990s I discussed it with guitarist Derek Bailey. His response, sent via letter, was hardly encouraging: “A book about the British imp. music scene would be a brave venture. Do you know any two people who agree about anything?”
More...