Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) is a research centre of the University of the Arts London dedicated to the exploration of the rich complexities of sound as an artistic practice.

Our main aim is to extend the development of the emerging disciplinary field of sound arts and to encourage the broadening and deepening of the discursive context in which sound arts is practised.

Research Feature: Baikal Ice

The Baikal Ice CD by Peter Cusack represents a sustained exploration, in sound, of a specific place. The techniques and practices involved in both the recording and in the composition of the recorded material relate to a long-standing themes for the researcher. These themes include an exploration of the relationship between landscape and soundscape, the extent to which our sense of place is affected by sound, and the issue of whether the creative practice of sound may provide an innovative perspective on our environment. Lake Baikal, in Siberia, is a unique place that has been designated a UN World Heritage site.
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Member Profile: John Wynne

Dr John Wynne’s diverse, research-led practice includes large-scale sound installations in galleries and public spaces, delicate sculptural works, photographs that reproduce sound, flying radios and award-winning ‘composed documentaries’ that hover on the borders between documentation and abstraction. His Installation for 300 speakers, Pianola and vacuum cleaner, developed during an AHRC-funded research residency, became the first piece of sound art in the Saatchi collection and won him the 2010 British Composer Award for Sonic Art. His work with endangered languages includes a project with click languages in the Kalahari Desert and another with one of Canada’s indigenous languages, Gitxsanimaax.
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Blog: Listening Across Disciplines: Caroline Devine composing with sounds that are ordinarily imperceptible

Read research project Listening Across Disciplines’ interview with Caroline Devine about how and why she listens in her work: "Composing with sounds that are ordinarily imperceptible or in some way absent"
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