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Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) is a research centre of the University of the Arts London dedicated to the exploration of the rich complexities of sound as an artistic practice.

 

Our main aim is to extend the development of the emerging disciplinary field of sound arts and to encourage the broadening and deepening of the discursive context in which sound arts is practised.

Research Feature: Haunted Weather

From 2001 research was carried out into the impact of digital tools such as the laptop computer on various forms of music and sound art, questioning whether a computer could replace conventional instruments, and how effective it could be as an improvising device. The book Haunted Weather by David Toop (with accompanying 2-CD compilation released by Staubgold 52, 2004) is an outcome of these investigations, but it also has become a survey of experimental music and contemporary sonic art practice. Wider questions concerning the significance of sound, noise and silence in space, perception and memory are also considered, as a continual yet often ignored presence in human society.
Further infomation on Haunted Weather

Member Profile: Simon Scott

Simon Scott's practice led research is field recording-based composition with an emphasis on an approach to listening that reflects the creative capacities of the listener, and a focus on climate change and habitat loss as narrative. His emerging theoretical framework addresses the critical aspects of the field of ecocriticism and examines ecocritical themes within the subject matter of works in this area, and identifies ecological principles within its form, operation, and within sound as a medium. 
Further infomation on Simon Scott

News: The Grain of Online Voices

Read 'The Grain of Online Voices' by Salomé Voegelin on Norient. 'Every physical interaction leaves traces. Yet, in online meetings, the human voice might be the only traceable feature left. In the fifth episode of «Sonic Vignettes», Salomé Voegelin reflects upon the grain of the voice as an irreducible trace of human contact and why it is endangered by AI cleaning language.'
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